fantasy · reading

Breaking of a mouse’s heart

I’ve started reading The Light Fantastic and this is my second Terry Pratchett book.

There was the faintest of pure sounds, high and sharp, like the breaking of a mouse’s heart.

The Light Fantastic by Terry Pratchett

This quote is utterly fantastic. I cannot quite picture what this sound is like – the death cries of a mouse? But it’s sticking in my head.

And I’m only in the beginning of this book. And the beginning of Terry Pratchett novels.

reading

Best Books of 2014

The year is almost over and I am once again listing the best books I read this year. Not, mind, the best books that came out this year but the best of the 61 books I’ve read this year. The complete list of the books I’ve read this year is here. Though most of this year’s reads did indeed come out this year.

1) Stories of the Raksura by Martha Wells

Stories of the Raksura is a collection of two novellas set in the same world as the previous three novels (The Serpent Sea, The Siren Depths, The Cloud Roads). It’s been less than two months since I first got it (it came out on October 7 2014. I didn’t get that day, sadly.) but I’ve read and reread both stories a few times since.  I really, truly love this world. It’s delightful, fast-paced and really, really good.

2) Ancillary Justice by  Ann Leckie

Ancillary Justice deserved its Hugo. I haven’t reread this at all – I probably will sometime in the future – but it’s wonderful. Confusing for some people, but still really good. I love the main character. Her gender confusion is amusing. But the end is a little odd.

3) Color of Magic by Terry Pratchett

Color of Magic somehow makes a completely ridiculous concept work. It’s amazing. Really amazing.

4) Point of Dreams by Lisa Barnett and Melissa Scott

Point of Dreams is a charming book, where astrology has real meaning and includes a good mystery. Fantasy and mystery, along with a bit of romance. Nothing too explicit, though. Murder, ghosts and astrology! I love this whole series. I love this series. It’s good enough that I’ve reread bits and pieces of this book several times.

Book Review · reading

The Color of Magic by Terry Pratchett

I finished Color of Magic by Terry Pratchett last week. This is the first time I read Color of Magic. I understand there is a movie; I have not seen it.

Blurb from GoodReads:

Terry Pratchett’s profoundly irreverent, bestselling novels have garnered him a revered position in the halls of parody next to the likes of Mark Twain, Kurt Vonnegut, Douglas Adams, and Carl Hiaasen.

The Color of Magic is Terry Pratchett’s maiden voyage through the now-legendary land of Discworld. This is where it all begins — with the tourist Twoflower and his wizard guide, Rincewind.

On a world supported on the back of a giant turtle (sex unknown), a gleeful, explosive, wickedly eccentric expedition sets out. There’s an avaricious but inept wizard, a naive tourist whose luggage moves on hundreds of dear little legs, dragons who only exist if you believe in them, and of course THE EDGE of the planet…

 

Okay, I have to admit the idea of a world transported on the back giant turtle strikes me slightly ridiculous. In fact, large parts of the book strike me as ridiculous. But it works. It all holds together and not in a ridiculous way. That’s amazing.

The idea of the naïve tourist is a good way to explore this world. He’s an insurance analyst. The very idea of insurance seems a foreign concept to other character, the inept wizard. The inept wizard is a cynical type, one who is forced by his leader and circumstance to actually keep his promise to be a good tour good for the tourist.

In the tourist’s travels, while explaining the idea of insurance to people, one person commits insurance fraud. The book never said so, but I suspect the person never gets his money.

I loved the idea of the invisible dragons, dragons that are only real if you are in the dragon area and if the dragon’s owner believes in them. It’s like riding an invisible airplane, while carrying an invisible gun. Sounds pretty wonderful, doesn’t it? Well, it sounds wonderful to me.

The Luggage is pretty damn interesting, too. I mean, the idea of Luggage, with a capital L, that bites and is infinitely large – well, it would never be lost, never be stolen, and you could carry whatever you liked!

Also, the net around the edge of the world that catches anyone who falls over. Good idea. Too bad it is not fool-proof.

I love it. I love it a lot more than I thought I would, considering how utterly silly the idea sounds.

The book ends when the inept wizard falls over the edge of the world. This is a cliffhanger, and I don’t think I approve. But, luckily, the second book is already out.