General

Teaser Tuesday: Heritage of Cyador

Teaser Tuesdays is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by MizB of Should Be Reading Anyone can play along! Just do the following:

• Grab your current read
• Open to a random page
• Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
• BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
• Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

My teaser:

As he half fills the beaker, he replies, “I don’t seek risks. I try to do only what is necessary.”

“That can be the greatest risk of all.”

– Heritage of Cyador  by L. E. Modesitt

reading · Teaser Tuesdays

Teaser Tuesday: Imager’s Challenge

Teaser Tuesdays is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by MizB of Should Be Reading. Anyone can play along! Just do the following:

• Grab your current read
• Open to a random page
• Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
• BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
• Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

“The scar?”

“The second one will be across his throat . . . not that anyone would find his body.” Seliora’s words were absolutely matter-of-fact.

– Imager’s Challenge by L.E. Modesitt

General

Teaser Tuesday: Legacies

Teaser Tuesdays is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by MizB of Should Be Reading. Anyone can play along! Just do the following:

• Grab your current read
• Open to a random page
• Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
• BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
• Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their  TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

My teaser:

Alucius turned the gray . . . when an enormous fist struck him in the back of the shoulder. For an instant, he could feel himself toppling forward before silver-tinged blackness – and a green radiance – swept up over him and swallowed everything.

Legacies (Corean Chronicles. book 01) by L. E. Modesitt.

This is from the book I blogged about yesterday.

Book Review · reading

Book Review: The Hammer of Darkness by L.E. Modesit

Blurb From GoodReads: Martin Martel is an exile in trouble with the gods in this SF novel by the bestselling writer L. E, Modesitt, Jr, now back in a new trade paperback edition from Tor.

After finding out that he has unusual powers, he is banished from the planet Karnak. Martin is thrust into the tranquil world of Aurore, vacation paradise for the galaxy. There he finds that the reality of Aurore is much different from its serene veneer. The gods are wantonly cruel and indifferent to the chaos they cause: are they really gods or just men and woman with larger-than-life powers? Whatever the answer Martin Martel must challenge their supremacy to defend his life, love, and the fate of all mankind.

I’ve read a lot of L.E. Modesitt’s books and enjoyed all of them. Except for this one. The Hammer of Darkness just confused me. I don’t understand the main character, one Martin Martel. I don’t understand his motivations or his goals.

Okay. So. There are gods and demi-gods and terrified worshipers. Odd, for a sci-fi novel. They have really mental powers, I get that. But the mental powers, the energy field they use, their god-like immortality, none of that is explained. It bothered me.

It’s also pretty clear from the writing this is an early book. I don’t know how early, but one of his earliest books. I mean, there is a big difference between this one and his latest book from this year.

What I liked: the main character does some sort of documentary of the religions of the planet. It was pretty fascinating. I would have liked to see more on this aspect of the world.

I think my biggest problem with the book is that the main character never really seemed to connect emotionally with others. He gets woman after woman. I mean, he says he loves this one, than the other one and he really lusts after these two. Another god kills the woman he says he loves, but he does nothing.

Then, later, he goes to another planet and destroys half the world. I never really understand why. He never really gave any reason for going to the other world in the first place. Afterward, the other gods see an opportunity – seeing as how he was away from his power base – to kill him. They fail and that fight that destroys a lot, too, but at least I understand destruction during a fight.

Than he comes back and takes one of the other goddesses back in time and places her as the daughter of a powerful lord in his world. It turns out she was the love of his life. But I don’t get why he took he back to the past. I just don’t.

The last scene is sweet and romantic. Apparently after destroying her rule and figuring out he wiped her memory and placed her as the daughter of a powerful noble, she decides she loves him after all.

I don’t get this book. I just don’t get it.

Book Review · fantasy · reading

Book Review: Scholar by L. E. Modesitt

From Goodreads: Hundreds of years before the time of Imager, the continent of Lydar is fragmented.  Years of war have consolidated five nations into three–Bovaria, Telaryn, and Antiago. Quaeryt is a scholar and a friend of Bhayar, the young ruler of Telaryn. Worried about his future and the escalating intrigues in Solis, the capital city, Quaeryt persuades Bhayar to send him to Tilbor, conquered ten years earlier by Bhayar’s father, in order to see if the number and extent of occupying troops can be reduced so that they can be re-deployed to the border with warlike Bovaria.

Quaeryt has managed to conceal the fact that he is an imager, since the life expectancies of imagers in Lydar is short. Just before Quaeryt departs, Bhayar’s youngest sister passes a letter to the scholar-imager, a letter that could well embroil Quaeryt in the welter of court politics he had hoped to leave behind. On top of that, on his voyage and journey to Tilbor he must face pirates, storms, poisonings, attempted murder, as well as discovering the fact that he is not quite who he thought he was. To make it all worse, the order of scholars to which he belongs is jeopardized in more ways than one.

Quaeryt supplements his income by imaging coins from whatever copper or silver is lying around. He tried to make gold coins once, but the effort nearly killed him. 😉

He is ship-wrecked, attacked, half-drowned and spends the second half of the book in a war zone. He is shot with a crossbow and hits people with a staff.

Despite all that Scholar contains very few fights, chases, slashing at the bad guys and things like that. That isn’t surprising; Quaeryt has a bad leg and doesn’t have any weapons training. All he has is his imaging abilities to protect him. And he can’t even acknowledge his imager abilities.

So the lack of fights is not surprising, but it is slightly disappointing. The last few imager novels had lots and lots of action, but the imager in question was a cop. Maybe I am spoiled. 😉

There are a lot of politics and a few philosophical discussions. Well, lectures – Quaeryt  gives homilies when the local priest is not available. He acts like a scholar; he spends lots of time reviewing records, interviewing people and things like that.

Scholar starts slow and that doesn’t sound interesting. But events move so you constantly wonder what’s going to happen next, where the book is going and so on. You want  (well, I want!) to turn the page. In fact, I got so into this book, I neglected Tricks of the Trade. (I have an ARC for Tricks of the Trade, and its back cover copy sounds a lot more interesting.)

Also, the book says Quaeryt has goals for imagers and scholars both. It never outlines them. But whatever they are, I suspect they are related to the position of imagers in the previous books.

The bad guy dies. There are questions, but no one can finger Quaeryt. That isn’t surprising; I pretty much expected Quaeryt to kill the bad guy like he did.

No, the surprise here is his engagement. This is only took me by surprise because I am so familiar with Modesitt’s other books. The hero always has a smart and beautiful SO. But marriage always takes more effort. You never get to the end and have the girl’s family announce the engagement without so much as a by-your-leave!

I expect the wedding will be in the next book and bring Quaeryt a whole host of new problems.

Scholar is stand-alone. You could read it without needing to read the other three books.

General · reading · Teaser Tuesdays

Teaser Tuesday: Scholar

Teaser Tuesdays is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by MizB of Should Be Reading. Anyone can play along! Just do the following:

* Grab your current read

* Open to a random page

* Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page

* BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)

* Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers! 

A perfect two lines for my teasers this time!

Yet . . . by capitalizing our names and the names of others, we are declaring that we are special, that we have a greater identity or are of greater import to the world than do those objects or creatures who the share the same common name, such as trees, or rocks, or pebbles, or ants, or cattle. At times, people name animals, especially those that are loved or that have served faithfully, and those names accord them somehow a higher place than animals that bear no names.

– Scholar by L. E. Modesitt