Teaser Tuesday: The Ghost Bride

Teaser Tuesdays is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by MizB of Should Be Reading Anyone can play along! Just do the following:

• Grab your current read
• Open to a random page
• Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
• BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
• Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

My teaser:
image

The graves were made like small houses or very large armchairs, with wings on either side to encompass a central tablet and small altar. The paths up the hills were overgrown with weeds and lalang, the sharp elephant grass that cuts you if you run finger along it.

– The Ghost Bride by Yangsze Choo

Friday Flash: Lost Fun

She chortled and spun the hard black lace. Sweet, delightful air rushed past her wings.

She grinned and hopped backward, watching. It spun and spun!

Oh! Such fun!

Below, her provider paused and looked up. Now he would see.

She jumped and grabbed hold of the pretty blackness and yanked, wings beating furiously.

It was off! It spun faster and faster, until she hardly needed to make it go. Wind pushed her forward, glorious, speedy air. It was better than her provider’s big metal den.

“Sofia!” Her provider stood below her, waving his hands. “No! No, Sofia. Sit.”

Concerned, she let go and drifted down. He only sounded like that when some danger tried to cut off her wings.

“Good girl.” His hands cupped her back, warm and comforting. “What were you doing up there anyway, huh? We’ll get you some sugar and you can play in your cart, okay? But stay away from the mill.”

End of NaBloPoMo

Today is the last day of November and thus the last day of National Blog Posting Month.

I made it. I can hardly believe I made it, but I did.

I posted everyday this month. God. Some posts were crappy, others were okay. Sometimes I posted at 7 or 8 at night, but I managed.

It was hard. I am glad it’s over. I am pretty sure I won’t do this again. I thinking posting two or three times a week is ideal for me.

Do you seek out holiday books?

I read a post yesterday on favorite holiday books and I thought: I don’t have any favorite   holiday reads.

That’s not to say I don’t read holiday themed books – I do, if it drops in my lap. Sometimes they do, and they are usually romance books. Maybe mysteries.

But I don’t go looking for them, don’t seek them out. If I see them on library shelves? Okay. Maybe I’ll take one out.

None of the books I love to reread involve the holidays. None. Is that weird?

Maybe it’s because I read mostly fantasy and there aren’t a whole lot of holiday-themed fantasy books.

Teaser Tuesday: Heritage of Cyador

Teaser Tuesdays is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by MizB of Should Be Reading Anyone can play along! Just do the following:

• Grab your current read
• Open to a random page
• Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
• BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
• Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

My teaser:

As he half fills the beaker, he replies, “I don’t seek risks. I try to do only what is necessary.”

“That can be the greatest risk of all.”

– Heritage of Cyador  by L. E. Modesitt

What makes a book hard to read?

One of the first books I never finished Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad. It was required reading for English class.

I learned that I could read the beginning, the end and the middle, and still answer all the questions the teacher asked and still manage to write the essays. (This lesson has been useful in subsequent English classes.)

Heart of Darkness, as I recall, is a short book. Certainly shorter than many of the multi-volume fantasies I loved to read. So length isn’t a factor in what makes a book hard to read.

But I don’t really know what the factors are that makes a book hard to read.

For me, such factors probably include:

  • Dense
  • Not Interesting
  • Strange language
  • No Plot
  • Offensive characters/Plot

1) Heart of Darkness might have been dense. Maybe. Probably.

2) I can’t remember how interesting Heart of Darkness was, but I’ve read boring books for class cover to cover, so I don’t think this was the most important reason why I couldn’t read it. Even though it was boring.

3) No plot will turn me off every time, but I am not sure Heart of Darkness is plotless. Not that I actually remember the plot. I don’t. All I remember is him meandering down a river. But I didn’t actually read the whole book, so maybe there was a plot.

4) Some of the book might have been offensive. I distinctly remember reading a comparison to creatures and then being in class and thinking: Oh those are black people! Yeah, offensive.

I think I gave up on the book shortly afterward.

Ice Bucket Challenge

I decided to look up various ice bucket challenges done by favorite writers.

This one is by Brandon Sanderson and the best thing about it is that he counties writing even after someone dumped a bucket of ice and water on him. Who does that? I mean, weren’t the papers a little hard to read after a wetting?

This one is Pat Rothfuss’s ice bucket challenge. I really love his “ice”. So smoky and dramatic.

This one is by Jim Butcher. He has ice, ice cream and an ice cream headache.

There are lots more on YouTube: Neil Gaiman, Stephen King, George Martin. But that’s more videos than I want to put here!

I wasn’t able to find any of the women whose books I go all fangirl on do an ice bucket challenge. Is that weird?

And, also, just because, here’s a video compilation of people failing at the ice bucket challenge.

Forever: 6 A.M.

I watched forever yesterday. It was about a song stolen from a musician and murder.

The song is 6 A.M. – is that a real song? I don’t know enough about jazz to say, but I think it’s probably made up.

But the thing that sticks in my mind is the discussion between father and son. The idea that jazz is a new type of music is funny. Funnier still is Henry going all, the music you kids listen to these days!

And the son is actually – in real life, not the show – decades older is strange. All this brought home that Henry really is the father. Strange as it looks.